ADVICE | VIDEOS | TIPS & TRICKS | SPRAYING FAQs | ABOUT | 877-475-9939

Welcome.

Spraying FAQ

1. Why is there different nozzle spacing for booms?

  • 20″ is most common spacing that fits many tips and provides good coverage
  • 15″ is used for applying higher rates of fertilizer and to split 30″ crop rows with drop nozzles
  • 10″ is not common mostly used for very high rates

Return to top

2. Do I need different nozzles for different chemicals?

  • Yes, there is basically 4 types of chemicals: Herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, fertilizers
  • Most pre-plant (herbicides) and fertilizers apply with lower pressure and larger droplet sizes
  • Most fungicides applied with higher pressure and smaller droplet size
  • Always check your chemical label for proper droplet size and chemical pressure

Return to top

3. What size strainers should I use in product line?

  • Strainers come in different mesh (size of holes) sizes. The lower the number the bigger the mesh (holes) in strainer, the higher the number the smaller the mesh (holes), i.e. 20 mesh larger holes, 100 mesh small holes.
  • The main strainer on sprayer should be same or larger than the last strainer on the sprayer (boom). The boom strainers should be the mesh size recommended with your nozzles (tips).
  • Fertilizers will require a larger mesh strainer than water based chemicals.

Return to top

4. How do the new drift guard nozzles drift less when they must be used at higher pressures?

Most drift guard nozzles have 2 orifices; the upper which is smaller and bottom is a larger applying orifice that also acts a venture to introduce air into the nozzle. So you are seeing boom pressure not actual spray pressure.

Return to top

5. Should I run strainers in each nozzle?

  • No, so long as you strain the water either into or directly out of all nurse tanks, have 1 main product strainer on the sprayer, and 1 strainer for each boom section of the sprayer.
  • Always use clean nurse water supplies. Never use creek, river, or pond water.

Return to top

6. Can I use the same nozzles from my pull type to my self-propelled sprayer?

  • Most of the time you will drive twice the speed with a self-propelled sprayer than a pull type.
  • So, you might be able to use your 10-gallon pull-type nozzles for a 5-gallon tip on your self-propelled as rough rule of thumb

Return to top

7. When should I replace my spray tips?

  • Damaged or worn out.
  • To check for worn nozzles is done by checking GPM per nozzle with tip calibrator (Spot-on)
  • Remember that everyone’s favorite chemical Round up contains ammonia sulfate this is abrasive that wears tips

Return to top

8. When should I use drops?

Most of the time they are used in a rescue application for row crops. Where it has been too wet or winding to apply and crops are taller the drop gets the chemical/fertilizer to the ground

Return to top

9. How often should I clean product strainers?

As needed. Remove them from the strainer body and flush with fresh water.
Return to top

10. How do I know when my strainers should be cleaned?

  • When the sprayer is building boom pressure not moving and then pressure will drop (like you turned it off) once the sprayer starts to move forward. This means the strainer is plugged and cannot allow flow.
  • Always have extra strainer body o-rings on hand because they sometimes swell once removed from strainer, from chemical and/or age.

Return to top

11. What is it and should I use an eductor on my sprayer?

An eductor introduces chemical into the product tank water. Once there is some product in the tank start your product pump and open the valving so that water can pass under the eductor, then open lid on eductor pour the chemical in and slowly open the valve at the bottom of the cone and it will be sucked into the water stream. Continue until all the required chemicals are in the product tank. This is a great way to get your chemicals in the sprayer tank without climbing on the sprayer. Some eductors can also draw dry granular into the system as well. Make sure to read the instructions with your eductor carefully.

Return to top

12. If I buy a rate controller for liquid application can I also use it for granular application?

Maybe. When making the purchase make sure to read the product list for the controller that specifies that it can act as a controller for both products.

Return to top

13. Is it cost effective to purchase precision ag products?

Most of the time they do. Consider what is most important to you and your operation? Boom leveling? Auto steer? Auto boom shut off?  Light bar? At the same time, how much money do you want to spend? If you are just getting into the precision ag products with your sprayer and want to start basic then maybe a light bar with auto boom shut off feature will be a great place to start; the return on investment will be quick. It is always a good idea to buy at platform that can be expanded upon with more options once you are ready. Raven, Trimble, and Outback all have great options and most can be expanded to use more than one product.

Return to top

14. How should I rinse and dispose of used chemical containers?

Always read and follow the label on the chemical container. Beware of all local laws regarding chemical waste and disposal.

Return to top

15. How often should I rinse my sprayer?

When switching chemicals, nightly, and/or as needed.

Return to top

16. I don’t think my control valve is working?

  • Is the rate controller in Auto or Manual mode? It should be in Auto.
  • In Manual mode you can increase or decrease the amount of flow. This will tell you if your control valve is working.

Return to top

17. How do I know my rate problem is not speed related?

  • Does rate controller read speed when the sprayer is moving forward? If yes, then does it read the correct speed?  It would be advisable to recalibrate your speed input.
  • If you read “no speed”, the sprayer will do little or nothing in auto.

Return to top

18. How do I know my flow meter is accurate?

  • Make sure the flow meter calibration number (tag on flow meter) matches the flow meter calibration number in rate controller.
  • If yes, then follow the re-calibration procedure for your flow meter.

Return to top

19. My rate controller is not showing any actual rate being applied?

  • Is the master switch turned on? If yes then is the sprayer actually spraying?
  • If yes, remove your flow meter and clean it with fresh water with no pressure (open end of garden hose). If still not reading a rate, then check your wiring from console to flow meter (check your manuals for detailed information).

Return to top

20. How does a rate controller work?

A rate controller needs all correct constants: boom width, speed, programmed rate (GPA).  The controller then looks at output (from flow meter) and either increases or decreases the control valve to match boom width, speed, and rate.

21. Should I spray during extreme hot or drought conditions?

  • Many products require weeds to be actively growing and not under heat stress for the chemical to work and all labels contain vital information on what measures must be put in place to ensure adverse outcomes do not occur.

Return to top

22. How do I manage weed resistance build up?

  • Resistance of diseases, pests and weeds to agricultural chemicals is a naturally occurring phenomenon that can be made worse by poor chemical use practices, so is essential for farmers to manage. Some groups of products and target weeds, pests and diseases are particularly susceptible to resistance build up and the only way to prevent it is to adequately manage rotations of different chemicals from different activity groups (for fungicides) or Modes of Action (for herbicides and insecticides).

Return to top

23. My Raven console is not showing a rate? How do I check my flow meter for operation?

Return to top

24. How do I read a nozzle chart?

  • The nozzle charts are set out as follows: read the sprayer speed to be used, and follow the column down to the desired application rate in gallons per acre. Then follow this row to the left, and you will find the required spraying pressure and the nozzle to be used.

Return to top